Loading

Bones Review: The Lazy in the Resolution

Last night’s episode of Bones brought resolution to the ongoing Pelant saga, as well as the discomfort he brought to the relationship between Booth and Bones and the lingering questions about Flynn’s involvement. That said, I feel a little bit as though it all happened too fast, with too-convenient (but not consistent) actions on the part of the characters.

The episode kicked off with the team at the Jeffersonian going on the offensive with Pelant. With Sweets’ help, they fashion a plan they believe will help draw the killer out of hiding—they take a body donated to the Jeffersonian and mutilate it in a way that would rival the twisted sickness of Pelant. Once they’ve got their “Prometheus,” Booth calls Agent Flynn and he agrees to arrange it at the dump site.

Bones9.3Pic1

A few hours later the body is discovered by a woman walking her dog, but upon closer inspection, its determined that the dead man is Flynn, not the one the squints prepared. As a group they feel guilt, but also anger, and the surety that killing one of Booth’s good friends ensures that Pelant’s time grows near.

When Brennan (Emily Deschanel) finds an anomaly on one of the Bones, it sends her into the archives, where she is confronted by Pelant—in person. He tells her that there are five unsolved murders that she and her team failed to connect, that they were all perpetrated by the same killer, and that they’ll solve the case without him.

Meanwhile, Flynn is looking guilty of being involved with Pelant. He received a surgery that he couldn’t have afforded, which was discovered to have been funded by a private donor. There were several passports and stacks of cash in his apartment, not to mention his super suspicious behavior when he took over the Pelant case a couple of seasons ago. Booth (David Boreanaz), however, refuses to believe his friend could have been part of anything and insists Flynn was being set up.

The kids at the lab continue to work the case. Cam (Tamara Taylor) and Brennan have a rather convenient conversation about whether or not they think Booth will kill Pelant as opposed to arresting him, then Sweets (John Francis Daley) arrives with a convenient assessment of Pelant’s changing strategy—suggesting that he’s trying to seduce Brennan to his side using the things she admires, which are his cunning and technique.

Brennan finds the clue he meant for her to find in the five extra skeletons around the same time that Hodgins (T.J. Thyne) uses a piece of a tooth in Flynn’s stomach to track down the most likely place Pelant is hiding out. When Angela (Michaela Conlin) hacks into the plants video feeds, however, they see Brennan arriving instead of Booth.

She gets inside where she confronts Pelant, then promptly gets outwitted by him only to be saved by Booth. To Brennan (and probably Pelant’s) surprise, Booth does give him the opportunity to surrender before taking him out, but the story arc ends the only way it can—with Pelant dead.

Bones9.3Pic2

Booth confesses to Brennan the reason he called off their engagement, and while the team at the lab watches through a silent video feed, Brennan agrees to marry him.

It’s the moment we’ve been craving for a while now, but for me, it fell a little bit flat. The word of the day is definitely convenient—the mistake by Pelant, the last minute assessment by Sweets and the conversation about Booth’s soul, which is supposed to make us believe Brennan would do something as stupid as go confront him on her own. I found the line of reasoning too weak to explain her break in character. It all feels like the writers were as weary of the Pelant storyline as the viewers, so much so that they couldn’t even put their hearts into a believable ending. Maybe they made him too smart, too hard to catch, but to me that was part of the challenge. I don’t agree with or like the decision to have him outsmart Bones one last time, only to have Booth rush in and save her.

In addition, we got no wrap up or answers as far as the purported female serial killer OR Flynn’s actual involvement with Pelant’s ongoing harassment of the team. As an author who takes care to wrap up loose ends and dangling threads, these couple of outstanding questions are irksome and grating.

All in all, I’m glad the storyline is put to bed and we can move on with our Bones lives. I don’t often complain about the writing on this show, as it tends to be tight and purposeful, but this episode should have been a pinnacle and felt a little lazy. On the upside, we’ve got a world of opportunities ahead, and a wedding to look forward to, as well!

What did you think of the end to Pelant’s story? Were you satisfied?

Follow Trisha Leigh on Twitter!

Season 9, Episode 3 “The Sense in the Sacrifice” (originally aired October 7, 2013)

Bones airs Monday nights at 8/7c on Fox.

Images courtesy of 20th Century Fox.

4 Comments

  1. I kind of liked that he was suddenly killed off. I expected it to be a whole thing, but no bam, instant death. He barely had time to look shocked that he was outsmarted.

    I DO agree though that the events leading up to that scene were rather forced. While the tooth thing kind of made sense, what with Brennan discussing that she solved a previous murder that way… the rest was a little off. I hope the episodes improve from here, I for one am happy that we’re done with Pelant.

    • I’m DEFINITELY not sorry to see the Pelant story put to rest. Pun intended. We’ll have to see what happens from here!

  2. I think they purposefully left the female serial killer story line hanging because it’s the new big bad. The producers have given several interviews where they’ve eluded to a new big bad that makes Pelant look like child’s play.

    • Oh, yeah, I do kind of recall that!! Guess we’ll have to wait and see… :)

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>